Talk:Cumberland Gap National Historical Park

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IUCN category[edit]

Does anyone know for sure the IUCN category for a National Historical Park such as this? --Tom Allen 05:34, May 24, 2005 (UTC)

Sizable?[edit]

Hi. At the moment the second paragraph begins thus: "The Cumberland Gap is a sizable natural break in the Appalachian Mountains." That word sizable (even if it's spelt correctly!) troubles me a bit by its imprecision. Can you imagine handing that in to a geography teacher? "Sizeable compared to what?" they might well thunder before throwing chalk at you. (Yes. I'm ancient, does it show?) Seriously, do you think we should (a) just omit this adjective or (b) replace or qualify it by saying what the size is, or how it's big relative to ... whatever? Thoughts please?? Cheers DBaK (talk) 07:36, 22 June 2009 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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External links modified[edit]

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Dear Wikipedians,[edit]

The last sentence of the last paragraph of the introduction states "The visitor center is open each day of the year except Christmas Day." Should this really be in the introduction. I just don't think it flows or is generally relevant with the rest of the introduction.Bryson H (talk) 00:26, 4 February 2018 (UTC)

Moving content[edit]

Moving this content to talk for the time being to make room. Will reincorporate what is well sourced as necessary. GMGtalk 13:09, 6 April 2018 (UTC)

Extended content
History
View from Pinnacle Overlook

The gap was long used by Native Americans, as many species of migratory animals passed through it from north to south each year. It was fertile hunting territory and the only easy cut through the mountains from the southern wintering grounds of wild deer and buffalo to their northern summer range.[1] Starting around 1775, the Gap became the primary route of transit for American settlers moving west into Kentucky; between 1775 and 1810 as many as 300,000 settlers may have used the Gap.[2]

Two families by the name of Hensley and Gibbons moved to Brush Mountain to escape the many changes that were taking place in the early 1900s. Eventually, more family members followed and a community was begun. A church and school was established under the jurisdiction of the Bell County School System of Bell County, Kentucky.

Settlers continued their pioneer lifestyle until future generations began accepting employment and marriage partners off the mountain. Sherman Hensley, the founder of the settlement, was the last to leave in 1951.[3]

Preservation
Brush Mountain School House

The park preserves the natural beauty of the surrounding area while focusing on historic preservation. Included in the park is Hensley Settlement, an early 20th-century Kentucky mountain community that has been preserved by the park service as representative of the early settler's life on top of Brush Mountain.

Cumberland Gap National Historical Park CUGA2560

Tours through the old Hensley Settlement, trips into Gap Cave, also known as Cudjo's Cave, (once used for shelter by traveling Indians and settlers)[4], living history events, campfire programs and demonstrations of the settlers' lifestyle provide a glimpse of life in the past, Appalachian music festivals and concerts provide another view of the life in this area.

The former roadbed of U.S. Highway 25E through the park has been restored to an early 19th-century wagon path. This was made possible with the 1996 completion of the Cumberland Gap Tunnel, which rerouted US 25E under the park.[5]

References

  1. ^ Cite error: The named reference history was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  2. ^ Kriplen, Nancy (September 13, 2009). "The Cumberland Gap, the Notch America Squeezed Through". The New York Times. Retrieved September 13, 2010. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ Eddy, Pam (July 8, 2009). "Protecting the Pioneer Spirit at Hensley Settlement". The Middlesboro Daily News. Archived from the original on July 14, 2011. Retrieved September 13, 2010. Unknown parameter |deadurl= ignored (|url-status= suggested) (help); CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "Guided Tours - Cumberland Gap National Historical Park (U.S. National Park Service)". www.nps.gov. Retrieved 13 February 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ "Cumberland Gap Tunnel". Retrieved September 13, 2010. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)