Talk:Brown University

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School of Engineering[edit]

It says that Brown has the oldest school of engineering in the Ivy League (a few lines above the claim that the School of Engineering came to be in 2010). It should say "oldest program in engineering" or "oldest engineering curriculum" or whatever is the factual phrase, and should state that this program was "reorganized" (or similar) into the School of Engineering in 2010, so as to make the situation more clear.

Removing claim to sole Egyptology department in Western Civilization[edit]

Dartmouth's claim of having the sole Western Egyptology department is incorrect. Oxford University has a long history of Egyptology, and has had an undergraduate degree program in the subject for many years.

This edit is a little baffling to me. First, the school in question is Brown not Dartmouth and the claim is that Brown has a department of Egyptology, not merely a degree. This is not to say that the field is not studied elsewhere -- UChicago, UPenn and Yale spring to mind immediately. However, none of these schools have a "Department of Egyptology," as such. At these universities, the field is more broadly considered as Near Eastern Civilization or such. However, Brown seems to be in the process of expanding the department, as evidenced by the change of name from "Egyptology" to "Egyptology and Western Asian Studies."82.226.175.224 12:29, 13 March 2007 (UTC)micahross

Removing unsourced material: Naked donut run, Naked party.[edit]

The following items have been tagged with requests for references for about a week; none have been provided. I am removing them from the article and parking them them here. They can be reinserted in the article when they are accompanied with verifiable source citations, per Wikipedia's verifiability policy and citation and reliable sources guidelines.

The verifiability policy is linked at the bottom of every edit box, and can be summarized: 1. Articles should contain only material that has been published by reputable sources. 2. Editors adding new material to an article should cite a reputable source, or it may be removed by any editor. 3. The obligation to provide a reputable source lies with the editors wishing to include the material, not on those seeking to remove it. Dpbsmith (talk) 00:21, 2 May 2006 (UTC)

Naked donut run[edit]

At the end of each semester, usually on the night before the first day of exams (the last day of "reading period"), naked students walk (despite the word "run" in the name) through the Rockefeller and Sciences Libraries and hand out donuts to their peers. Neither the organization nor the precise timing of the "run" are publicly known, with the recruitment of participants usually occurring within 24 hours of the actual run. The role of head organizer is secretly passed from an upperclassman to an underclassman every year or two, and has usually been associated with one of the campus's co-ed fraternities or residential co-ops. If a naked donut run fails to occur during a semester, a new organizer will often take up the tradition the following term.

What kind of source would work for this? This definitely occurs and the description above is completely accurate. -Brown '10 138.16.59.166 (talk) 07:00, 4 December 2009 (UTC)

See the "Brown Traditions" page, it has references for both the naked donut run and the naked party.

Naked party[edit]

Every fall, the Brown Association for Cooperative Housing (BACH) throws an invitation-only "naked party" where all guests remove their clothes upon entry. The hosts aim to create a comfortable setting where people of all body types can celebrate the naked human body. In contrast to the sexually suggestive dancing that can be found at many college parties, dancing at a "naked party" is paradoxically much more tame and devoid of physical contact.

A capella[edit]

Back in my day, the a capella groups often sang under Wayland Arch; is this still done? The strong tradition of a capella appears not to be noted anywhere in the article. stylobix 19 May 2006

The a capella groups still sing under Wayland Arch, in addition to several other places around campus, such as the Mochamp arch. NBS525 23:36, 19 May 2006 (UTC)
Seconded. This definitely still occurs. "Arch sings" as they are called, are extremely common for a cappella groups. (occurring multiple times per year). - Brown '10 138.16.59.166 (talk) 06:59, 4 December 2009 (UTC)

Concentration List/Organization section[edit]

I've edited out the concentration/graduate school offerings list and placed it in a separate article; however, the entire section could probably use an overhaul. billobob 25 Jun 2006

History of Mathematics.[edit]

I edited the line that "Brown has the only undergraduate History of Mathematics Department in the world." The last faculty member who had an interest in teaching undergraduates retired in 1986. The last faculty member died in November 2005. Currently, there is one graduate student finishing a dissertation and no courses are offered.

I don't think it ever offered undergrad. degrees, did it? JJL 00:01, 11 July 2006 (UTC)
No, it never did. Although it is a bit unencyclopedic, it might be interesting to preserve the history of the dept. [1] ----micahross —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 82.226.175.224 (talk) 12:39, 13 March 2007 (UTC).
Your statement, "The last faculty member who had an interest in teaching undergraduates retired in 1986," is incorrect. As of only a few years ago courses were still offered to undergraduates in the department. Here are reviews of some of those courses, for example: [2] [3] NBS525 13:11, 11 July 2006 (UTC)

Why have the edits been reverted so that it looks as if the Hist. of Math. dept. is still active? It's not and all the books once associated with the dept. have been moved out of Wilbour Hall.Micahross 11:38, 7 October 2007 (UTC)micahross

FROM ARMPIT OF THE IVIES TO HOT IVY[edit]

Consider adding a discussion about this part of Brown's history.

The basic points of this section would be:

1. From the late 19th century until after 1960, Brown was a regional college drawing students mostly from Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Nationally it was known as a less rigorous elite college, where less ambitious, more sociable sons could study. (I am trying to find the source for this - I read it in a history book while an undergrad at Brown, I think example students of this ilk were son of IBM founder, Tom Watson Jr., (1937) and son of the Standard Oil founder, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. (1897).)

2.In the early to mid 1970s, Brown had to draw down its endowment to meet operating expenses and was considered to be on the verge of bankruptcy.

3. The combination of Howard Swearer's leadership (he was president from 1977 to 1988) and the appeal of the New Cirriculum in attracting top applicants led Brown to be labelled the "hot Ivy". It had one of the lowest acceptance rates and in 1988 was ranked #4 in the U.S. News and World Report rankings (they put more emphasis on selectivity and reputation and less on financial resources).

4. From the mid 1980s, Brown differentiated itself through its reputation for drawing children of celebrities and left wing politicians, and as a hip and trendy place. The 1998 Vanity Fair article on this subject captured the dominant campus culture from the late 1980s to the mid 1990s.

(An aside: as the student body continues to become truly national and less New York-centric, and more conventional and career oriented, question whether Brown will continue to differentiate itself from financially stronger peers).

Cbmccarthy 14:56, 14 September 2006 (UTC)

Pacifica House the remaining active secret society on campus?[edit]

I am confused to the "long standing consensus" of the diminished activities of Pacifica House at Brown. One quick example I found of recent Pacifica work is noted on the CCC (College Curriculum Council) Report on Grading, http://www.brown.edu/Administration/Dean_of_the_College/documents/Grading_Report.pdf Would someone please enlighten me before I revert the edit to include the portion in the 'secret society' section to include Pacifica as an active society?

Here's the last time we discussed it. "Present-day existence of some organization related to Brown calling itself 'Pacifica House'" isn't the issue. The specific problems to my mind is (still) lack of WP:V WP:RS for it being a "secret society", it being related to the secret societies from the days of yore, vs being anything WP:NOTABLE beyond any other student club giving itself that name. Note that the CCC report does not speak to the concept of a "secret society". The only ref to Pacifica House in it is to that organization's own publication (which again does not support the secret-society connection nor notability of the present-day group) and as a self-pub does not really qualify as a good source for info about the group itself. DMacks 06:54, 29 December 2006 (UTC)

There are two societies. One is Pacifica House, one is the Nathanael Greene Society, which appears to be new. I'm troubled by the reference to Athenian at Queens. It was a society at Queens College New York, not Brown university. The footnote is to a blog. I emailed the owner of the blog to find out which book he'd used, checked out the book, and found that the blog is wrong. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Junseth (talkcontribs) 17:18, 1 August 2009 (UTC)

Trivia[edit]

The Trivia section says that Andrea Sachs from "The Devil Wears Prada" graduated from Brown. If I remember correctly, they went to Northwestern. The Northwestern page says this also... Can someone verify this for me? --Sbrools (talk . contribs) 04:19, 11 February 2007 (UTC)

Andrea goes to Brown in the novel, but attends Northwestern in the movie. The screenwriters felt that Northwestern was a stronger school to emphasis her journalism degree. Brown doesn't have such a degree, whereas Northwestern is known for at least "producing" strong journalists.

Modern Traditions Section[edit]

I deleted the entire section. It consisted of three "scandalous" parties and a naked run. These issues were carrying far too much weight in the article, and not painting an accurate, dispassionate picture about Brown. The issue of scandalous parties should maybe be condense to one small section, but I don't think it belongs in the article at all.— Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.81.249.92 (talk) 11:28, 16 February 2007

The modern traditions have had a long and troubled history on this page, but they have always endured. You're more than welcome start another discussion about whether they should be removed, but until then, it should stay. --seliopou 21:13, 16 February 2007 (UTC)

Ok. I feel entirely justified in removing the Starf*ck section though. While Sex Power God is a big deal on campus, Starf*ck is poorly attended and just not a very important fact at Brown. It's a total joke that it should have a line in the index. There are dozens of traditions and recurring campus events that are far more significant. Whatever the past discussion has been on this issue, I'm definitely in the right on this. Its inclusion in an encyclopedia article on Brown University is indefensible. I feel the same way about the naked coop party, but I'll other users decide if it should be deleted. The coop party is of interest to a few hundred undergraduates, at most. Basically, the modern traditions section makes a point: Brown has some edgy parties and is sexually progressive. This is fine, and it's true. But a short item about sex power god would communicate that just fine--seperate info about all the coop party, naked doughnuts and starf*ck is overkill. It misrepresents Brown and makes for a sloppy encyclopedia article. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 88.153.40.179 (talk) 13:07, 18 February 2007

Now the modern traditions sections seems to have been replaced by an anodyne discussion of Josiah Carberry supposedly being a "tradition" at Brown. Can any alumni vouch for this tradition's legacy? In the early 1990s, it seems to have been resurrected by the University as the source of the name of the snack bar in the new dorms built in 1992, Josiah's.

Cbmccarthy (talk) 17:33, 9 January 2013 (UTC) (Class of '93)

24 spoof video[edit]

I've removed its link twice now. Anyone at all think it's actually notable, please speak up... DMacks 19:22, 19 February 2007 (UTC)

Who's Joe?[edit]

"Joe will never get into this college" ?? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 88.155.28.89 (talk) 09:59, 3 April 2007

It was childish vandalism. It's gone now. -- Rob C (Alarob) 12:04, 4 July 2007 (UTC)

Boldly Brown[edit]

Should the Boldly Brown campaign for academic enrichment be added into the recent developments area of the university article? It may be fitting considering the developments that are taking place in campus expansion and faculty enlargement (an attempt to lower the student:faculty ratio). Seems to be a large component of the administration's undertakings. Also, swim center construction and the old stone bank? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.235.246.164 (talk) 20:12, 4 June 2007

I trimmed this section as it read as original research and also per relevance. I left the lead and fixed the reference. Anyways, --Tom 13:25, 9 August 2007 (UTC)
I've just updated the Boldly Brown material in line with the latest figures on the Boldly Brown website.
--Acephalica (talk) 19:50, 22 July 2009 (UTC)

POV[edit]

This article, especially under the section Academics, reads to much like admissions literature and seems somewhat promotional. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.140.251.83 (talk) 20:55, 6 June 2007

Unsourced material[edit]

Can be tagged or removed by an editor. I removed the following "Brown was also one of the first institutions to emphasize computer science as well as media studies, with its department of Modern Culture and Media, where students study film production, film criticism, and critical theory." since you probably won't find a source for this. If you do, please post it here and I will add this material back. Thanks! --Tom 20:20, 30 July 2007 (UTC)


Rankings and International Recognition[edit]

Did someoen remove the rankings section on here? Also does anyone know about Brown's international reputation? Is it even that well known outside the US? Should this topic be included in the article? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.245.75.17 (talk) 19:43, 4 September 2007 (UTC)

Brown Template & Wikipedia Presence[edit]

I created the Brown University Template. Please feel free to add this to all the different pages that deal with Brown and add new content to the template as you see fit.

Furthermore, I would really like to see Brown's presence on wikipedia increased. There is a lot of random information about the school that is still missing or scattered in unorganized pages. I think we are missing a lot of pages that the other ivy league schools have. Maybe we should start thinking about breaking up the main page into separate sub-pages?

Pages that I would like to see created or worked on:

Apavlo 14:27, 2 October 2007 (UTC)

Unless anybody vehemently objects, I am going to try to clean up the main page and break out certain sections into their own pages. I really like how the Dartmouth page is less cluttered than ours. In their article, long sections are broken out into separate pages with the link at the top of the section. I see this as having two benefits: (1) the main page has a cleaner look, and (2) things that may not be notable enough for the main article will certainly be germane in the sub-articles. I think that unless we start breaking things out into their own pages, the article is just going to get larger, messy, and unwieldy.

So to start, I am going to break out the following pages:

I also realize that there is already the Encyclopedia Brunoniana which has a lot of information about various aspects of Brown, but it was written 15 years ago and does not contain all the information about things and it does not contain any pictures. Apavlo 03:45, 4 October 2007 (UTC)

Unreferenced Tag on New Curriculum[edit]

I just moved an {{unreferencedsection}} tag from the bottom of the History section to the New Curriculum section. Per edit number 91472679 by GearedBull, this tag belonged on the New Curriculum section (see [4]). - AWeenieMan (talk) 02:08, 5 December 2007 (UTC)

Some good refs are probably the Encyclopedia Brunoniana entry, the original GISP paper, and any of many BDH articles covering "how things are now" or "how to take advantage of your opportunities" or "they might change things". Thanks to short institutional memory among undergrads, there are many such articles over the years, such as this recent and detailed one. Can we slap those loose as "References" for the whole section or do we need to add specific ones as footnotes supporting specific statements? DMacks (talk) 02:37, 5 December 2007 (UTC)
I {{fact}} tagged where I think we need citations. Some of them will probably be duplicates. I also uploaded a photo of Robinson Hall I took this summer (apparently there was one there before without copyright information). - AWeenieMan (talk) 03:05, 5 December 2007 (UTC)
We are down to 2 {{fact}} tags, both of which I believe can be satisfied with the original GISP paper, however without seeing the text myself I cannot be sure. It also might be worth citing the line about the curriculum itself being different then the GISP with the BDH article you linked. - AWeenieMan (talk) 04:34, 5 December 2007 (UTC)

College v. University[edit]

I am curious: If Harvard, Yale, and Columbia Universities, among others, retain at least nominal subunits known as Harvard College, etc., why doesn't Brown? Is the undergraduate college within Brown U. also known as "Brown University" in somewhat the same way as the whole university surrounding Dartmouth College is also known as "Dartmouth College"? Greener08 (talk) 12:36, 2 April 2008 (UTC)

Within the university, the undergraduate programs are within an administrative unit called "The College", separate from the Graduate School and the Medical School. There is a separate dean in charge of each. DMacks (talk) 13:56, 2 April 2008 (UTC)

Profile Section Badly Written[edit]

I've given the Profile section a cursory edit for really poor style, but it needs much more help.

--NoNonsenseHumJock (talk) 02:28, 16 January 2009 (UTC)


Founding of Brown[edit]

Brown University is one of a very small number of American colleges or universities that were uniquely founded under the legal authority of a foreign power, i.e. the United Kingdom through the rule of various British monarchs with power and control over American territory during the colonial period. This unique identity has historic and legal significance to anyone interested in American colonial history and, also, the history of America's oldest universities. That finite colonial heritage also reveals Brown's historical ties to principles of religious diversity and political dissent as exemplified by the involvement of the Baptists in the foundation of Brown. Several of the personages listed in the Brown Charter are of actual historic interest to any review of this historic period. Some of these personages may have been temporarily forgotten over time for a variety of reasons and deserve research into their lives and accomplishments. Due to time constraints for various contributors to this article, it may take time for separate, accurate articles to be written concerning those Brown Charter signatories and advocates whose names are currently in red. The Brown Charter is of interest not only to lawyers and members of the Brown community but also to students of this historical period who wish to develop a better understanding of the figures who played roles not only in Brown's foundation but in influential undertakings in religion, politics, government, business, etc. in Rhode Island and in the other original thirteen colonies, e.g. Ezra Stiles. (In fact, it is likely that a large majority of the Brown community have never had the opportunity to read any part of the Brown Charter.) This section can certainly be enhanced over time with more streamlined citation format and further relevant factual contributions concerning the individuals named. However, impulsive deletion of parts of this section without careful consideration of the historic interest and relevance of these figures and the Brown Charter would be unhelpful to those seriously interested in Brown's foundation.

Brown's Involvement with the American Revolution[edit]

Today is the anniversary of American independence from the British Empire. The W3R route is of sufficient historic interest to the United States and to students of the American Revolutionary period that it has been declared an official site of interest by the National Park Service. Cursory review of its historical significance will reveal that the route involved leading figures in the American Revolutionary War, including George Washington, Rochambeau, James Manning and others. The start of the trail in Rhode Island also involved the conversion of the oldest building at Brown into military barracks for American and allied soldiers, which is an interesting historic fact unknown even to many Brown students and graduates.

Stephen Hopkins was significantly involved in the American Revolution and in Brown's foundation. The famous Trumbull portrait featuring him is directly relevant to both Brown and one of the most important events in the American Revolution. This section can certainly be enhanced over time with more streamlined citation format and further relevant factual contributions concerning the individuals named. However, impulsive deletion of parts of this section without careful consideration of the historic interest and direct relevance of these events and historic documents would be unhelpful.

Discussion of open curricula at Curriculum[edit]

I've done some work at Curriculum, including making sections for the different types of curricula at US colleges. Any work that people can do to expand the section on open curricula there would be much appreciated.

- Mgcsinc (talk) 17:47, 25 October 2009 (UTC)

Universities COTM Nomination[edit]

Hello Brown University contributors. I just wanted to let you all know that Brown University has been renominated for next month's WikiProject Universities Collaboration of the Month. If you'd like to take advantage of this opportunity, be sure to vote for the university. While you're there, consider helping improve one of our current Collaborations of the Month.

Happy editing! -Mabeenot (talk) 19:47, 25 November 2009 (UTC)


Please correct the incorrect data under admission: "For the class of 2013 the undergraduate..." —Preceding unsigned comment added by E009821 (talkcontribs) 19:50, 9 March 2010 (UTC)

Lead commendation[edit]

I wanted to commend the editors of this article for maintaining an informative and neutral lead devoid of ranking-cruft and other un-encyclopedic and non-notable superlatives. Truly rare to witness on Wikipedia university articles without significant whining and arm twisting. Madcoverboy (talk) 04:33, 17 April 2010 (UTC)

Founders and proclamations[edit]

Removing this content from the article since Wikipedia is not a directory. Storing it here for now. Madcoverboy (talk) 20:37, 26 May 2010 (UTC)

Petitioners for the Creation of Brown University[edit]

At the General Assembly of the Governor and Company of the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, in New England, in America, begun and holden by adjournment at East Greenwich, within and for the Colony aforesaid, on the last Monday in February, in the year of our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Sixty-four, and fourth of the reign of His Most Sacred Majesty George the Third, by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, and so forth. AN ACT FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY WITHIN THIS COLONY

"Petitioners" and "undertakers in the valuable design ... to found, endow, order, and govern a College or University within this Colony":

Daniel Jenckes, Esq., Nicholas Tillinghast, Esq., Nicholas Gardiner, Esq., Col. Josias Lyndon, Col. Elisha Reynolds, Peleg Thurston, Esq., Simon Pease, Esq., John Tillinghast, Esq., George Hazard, Esq., Col. Job Bennet, Nicholas Easton, Esq., Arthur Fenner, Esq., Mr. Ezekiel Gardner, Mr. John Waterman, Mr. James Barker, Jr., Mr. John Holmes, Solomon Drown, Esq., Mr. Samuel Winsor, Mr. Joseph Sheldon, Charles Rhodes, Esq., Mr. Nicholas Brown, Col. Barzillai Richmond, Mr. John Brown, Mr. Gideon Hoxsey, Mr. Thomas Eyres, Mr. Thomas Potter, Jr., Mr. Peleg Barker, Mr. Edward Thurston, Mr. William Redwood, Joseph Clarke, Esq., Mr. John G. Wanton, and Mr. Thomas Robinson,

Founding Fellows and Trustees of Brown University[edit]

File:Stephen Hopkins.jpg
Stephen Hopkins with Brown University in the background

"... known in law by the name of Trustees and Fellows of the College or University in the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, in New England, in America...":

Hon. Stephen Hopkins, Esq., The Hon. Joseph Wanton, Jr., Esq., The Hon. Samuel Ward, Esq., The Hon. William Ellery, Esq., John Tillinghast, Esq., Simon Pease, Esq., James Honyman, Esq., Nicholas Easton, Esq., Nicholas Tillinghast, Esq., Darius Sessions, Esq., Joseph Harris, Esq., Francis Willet, Esq., William Logan, Esq., Daniel Jenckes, Esq., George Hazard, Esq., Nicholas Brown, Esq., Jeremiah Niles, Esq., Joshua Babcock, Esq., Mr. John G. Wanton, The Rev. Edward Upham, The Rev. Jeremiah Condy, The Rev. Marmaduke Brown, The Rev. Gardner Thurston, The Rev. Ezra Stiles, The Rev. John Greaves, The Rev. John Maxson, The Rev. Samuel Winsor, The Rev. John Gano, The Rev. Morgan Edwards, The Rev. Isaac Eaton The Rev. Samuel Stillman, The Rev. Samuel Jones, The Rev. James Manning, The Rev. Russel Mason, Col. Elisha Reynolds, Col. Josias Lyndon, Col. Job Bennet, Mr. Ephraim Bowen, Joshua Clarke, Esq., Capt. Jonathan Slade, John Taylor, Esq., Mr. Robert Strettle Jones, Azariah Dunham, Esq., Mr. Edward Thurston, Jr., Mr. Thomas Eyres, Mr. Thomas Haszard, Mr. Peleg Barker,

And it is further enacted and ordained by the authority aforesaid that each Trustee and Fellow, as well those nominated in this Charter as all that shall hereafter be duly elected, shall, previous to their acting in a corporate capacity, take the engagement of allegiance prescribed by the law of this Colony to His Majesty King George the Third, his heirs and rightful successors to the crown of Great Britain, which engagement shall be administered to the present Trustees and Fellows by the Governor or Deputy Governor of this Colony, ....

At the annual meeting of the corporation on September 4, 1782, the first after the French troops evacuated the college edifice, the chancellor “moved that the college Charter be read. And it thereby appearing... that in consequence of the American Revolution, many things therein were evidently inconsistent with our present state of National Independence,” a committee of three was elected “to revise the same.” Later in the day the committee presented a new engagement which omitted the oath of allegiance to King George: “You [name of individual] being elected a [Trustee or Fellow] of the College or University in the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, do solemnly engage, that you will faithfully execute the said office, agreeably to the Charter of the said College or University, to the best of your Judgment or ability.” The committee also expressed the opinion that the Corporation should “report the necessity of this alteration to the General Assembly, & request their approbation of the measure; & their establishment in future of the present form, or such other as they shall think fit to substitute.”

Source: Brown University Charter

See also: Walter C. Bronson’s The History of Brown University (Providence, 1914).

Slavery section[edit]

It looks like there is a minor edit skirmish over the inclusion of material about slavery and the history of Brown University. I personally like the material and think it should be included as it's interesting and well-sourced. However, I have some sympathy with the assertion that it's just too long and is given undue weight (my sympathy is much more with the former than the latter given that this topic has historically been given undue weight since it is shameful and a dark stain on the institution's past). Why not compromise by giving a brief overview here and then linking to a new article with more detail? ElKevbo (talk) 06:48, 14 June 2010 (UTC)

I support this proposal. -Mabeenot (talk) 06:57, 14 June 2010 (UTC)
I also support this proposal. I haven't done any looking, but there may be opportunities to merge this with information about similar studies done at other schools. - Mgcsinc (talk) 07:03, 14 June 2010 (UTC)

Weather risk[edit]

This may be a weird question for an Ivy League school but has the campus ever had buildings damaged or classes canceled due to hurricanes?

Like the New England Hurricane of 1938? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 12.196.0.50 (talk) 07:46, 24 September 2010 (UTC)

Yes of course. Also in 1954. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.172.214.170 (talk) 23:48, 17 June 2011 (UTC)

More recently, classes were closed on October 29 and 30, 2012, for Hurricane Sandy. [1][2]

References

  1. ^ "Monday at Brown: Classes canceled, administrative offices closed". Brown University. Retrieved 29 May 2014.
  2. ^ "Brown cancels classes for Oct. 30". Brown University. Retrieved 29 May 2014.

Kzirkel (talk) 01:18, 29 May 2014 (UTC)

Also, sometimes Brown closes because of severe winter weather. Classes were cancelled Feb 7, 2013[1]; Jan 3, 2014[2]; January 26, 2015; and February 9, 2015 because of winter blizzards. Sorry, I don't have citations for the last two, I don't think a press release was issued. Is this information important, anyway?

References

  1. ^ Trew Crist, Darlene. "Brown cancels classes, closes offices". Brown University. Retrieved 11 March 2015.
  2. ^ Nickel, Mark. "Brown University offices are closed Friday". Retrieved 11 March 2015.

Kzirkel (talk) 13:50, 11 March 2015 (UTC)

Moving 'Student organizations'[edit]

The Student organizations section of this article has been steadily expanding lately. If there are no objections, I'm going to go ahead and move it to its own article. - Mgcsinc (talk) 17:42, 2 April 2011 (UTC)

Joukowsky Institute[edit]

Why do I not find anything about the Joukowsky Institute for Archeology, which seems to be a not very unimportant part of Brown University? cf. http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Joukowsky_Institute/ --Dlugacz (talk) 19:51, 28 August 2011 (UTC)

There's a separate wikipedia page on it: Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World. Not sure why no one has integrated info about it here, but feel free to -- anyone can edit wikipedia! -- Mgcsinc (talk) 22:54, 28 August 2011 (UTC)

Request[edit]

According to their website, Brown University has access to Europa World Plus. Is there anyone here who wants to download some entries for me?--Antemister (talk) 19:12, 14 December 2011 (UTC)

Title of RI colonial governors[edit]

I've removed the reference to "Royal Governors" and "King George III" in addressing Rhode Island colonial governors Stephen Hopkins and Samuel Ward. Like all other governors of the Rhode Island colony, these men were not royal appointees, as were found in many of the other colonies. Instead, they were elected by the freemen of the colony, as outlined in Rhode Island's Royal Charter of 1663. The only time in its history when Rhode Island had a royal appointee as governor was when the colony was thrown into the Dominion of New England with all the other northeastern colonies, and Sir Edmund Andros was appointed governor over all the associated colonies.Sarnold17 (talk) 00:41, 26 December 2011 (UTC)

Brown Starr - business school?[edit]

When I look at this page: CV Starr Program in Business, Entrepreneurship and Organizations I see an undergraduate business concentration (albeit not AACSB-accredited) that I will thereafter refer to as Brown Starr. But is Brown Starr an actual business program? If so, Brown is not "one of only two schools in the Ivy League with neither a business school nor a law school" anymore since it would technically have a business school, if undergraduate-only.--Xiaoshan Math (talk) 03:03, 28 January 2014 (UTC)

It appears to just be a concentration that is "sponsored by the departments of Economics and Sociology and the School of Engineering." That seems to be pretty far away from a dedicated business school. ElKevbo (talk) 03:28, 28 January 2014 (UTC)

Onsager[edit]

It is interesting that Brown claims Nobel Laureate Onsager as one of their own. He was denied tenure and sent away. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 129.67.66.130 (talk) 13:56, 22 May 2014 (UTC)

I dont think it is reasonable to suppose that Brown makes any such claim based on his inclusion in this wikipedia article which is not maintained by Brown university. Someone clearly included Onsager based on the fact that he was at a given point a faculty member there. User:Maunus ·ʍaunus·snunɐw· 19:48, 23 May 2014 (UTC)

Political culture[edit]

User:RIConLaw1243 added several paragraphs on Brown's political culture. Needless to say, phrases like "notoriously" and "infamously" liberal are non-neutral and the examples given lack historical context for inclusion. I'd welcome any thoughts on how to go about crafting a few sentence or paragraph providing a sober overview on the current political climate, major historical events, and influential people, not creating a laundry list of drummed-up fauxtroversies. Madcoverboy (talk) 01:08, 28 June 2014 (UTC)

Edit warring to note that Brown is "not...up to par with the other Ivy League institutions"[edit]

Hellyeahdog is edit warring to insert the following statement into this article: "Brown is considered not to be up to par with the other Ivy League institutions." Four other editors, including me, have reverted this edit. I can't speak for the other editors but I object to inserting this text as it's only been included with one source (U.S. News & World Report) that doesn't explicitly support the statement. In any case, edit warring is unacceptable and will likely lead to a block if it continues. ElKevbo (talk) 01:36, 2 November 2015 (UTC)

The source provided also does not seem to support the claim implicitly.·maunus · snunɐɯ· 01:59, 2 November 2015 (UTC)
Too late, I saw the behavior and gave a 24h/EW block before I saw the talkpage here. He'd already received 2 warnings. DMacks (talk) 03:28, 2 November 2015 (UTC)

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COI -- I am the director of communications for the Brown Graduate School and respectfully request consideration of additional information to round out the view of the institution.

Under History, in the second paragraph, after the reference to Engineering, please add the history of graduate education at Brown: Brown was one of the early doctoral granting U.S. institutions in the late 19th century, adding master and doctoral studies in 1887.[1]

Academics: Graduate Education

The first Brown University master’s degrees were awarded in 1888 and the first PhD in 1889. In 1903, a Graduate Department was established with its own dean. In May 1927, the Graduate Department became the Graduate School. [2]

The Graduate School now offers more than 80 graduate programs, including those of the School of Engineering, the School of Public Health, and the School of Professional Studies. Graduate students are a quarter of the student population. [3]

The number of master’s programs and students has grown in the past decade. In 2016, the Graduate School conferred 626 master’s degrees, compared with 239 in 2007. [4]

The Graduate School honors distinguished alumni with the Horace Mann Medal. [5]

From its earliest years, women have been a part of doctoral education at Brown. Women were admitted to graduate study at Brown beginning in 1892. The first woman to receive a doctoral degree was Martha Tarbell, who received a PhD in German studies in 1897. The first Asian American receiving a PhD was Sze-Chen Liao in 1921. In the next decade, the first African American PhD, Samuel M. Nabrit, received a degree in biology in 1932; Jose Amor y Vazquez was the first Hispanic American to receive a graduate degree, in Hispanic studies in 1957; and Lora Lee Johnson, the first Native American, obtained a PhD in classics in 1984. [6] Bjlarson (talk) 19:44, 20 September 2016 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ Bronson, Walter C., The History of Brown University. Providence: Published by the University, 1914, pages 407-408
  2. ^ Bronson, p. 481; Martha Mitchell’s Encyclopedia Brunoniana
  3. ^ Graduate School website and Brown Office of Institutional Research website
  4. ^ Brown Office of Institutional Research website
  5. ^ Graduate School website
  6. ^ Brown Graduate School “History” webpage

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External links modified[edit]

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Is George Lincoln Rockwell a notable alumnus?[edit]

Tmnh07 has begun an edit war to remove George Lincoln Rockwell from this article's listing of notable alumni. I contend that he is unquestionably notable and I dispute the reasons that Tmnh07 used in his or her most recent edit summary ("first, Rockwell is not actually a graduate of Brown University, so inclusion is misleading; second, American Nazi Party has no substantive following"). First, one does not have to graduate to be an alumnus; that is a common (but understandable!) misunderstanding. And the section of the article is titled "Notable people" anyway. Second, it doesn't seem relevant that the "American Nazi Party has no substantive following" as that (a) seems to inappropriately require contemporary membership in a historic organization and (b) unreasonably assumes that only organizations with a "substantive following" can have importance. There may be other grounds for omitting this alumnus but those particular reasons are poor ones. Finally, I caution editors who may want to omit this alumnus solely or primarily because he is embarrassing or portrays the university in a poor light; those are unacceptable reasons for censoring a Wikipedia article. ElKevbo (talk) 20:54, 27 October 2017 (UTC)

He's definitely not an alumnus. You have to graduate for that. Notable person - that's up for discussion. Is there anyone else listed in that section who attended Brown, didn't graduate, and didn't return as faculty or staff later? --SarekOfVulcan (talk) 20:56, 27 October 2017 (UTC)
All others who are given a visual likeness are graduates of the University. I'd like to also articulate that the American Nazi Party has NEVER had a substantive following--and by that I mean that no member of the party has held elected office before (at least to my knowledge). Finally, The American Nazi Party is not an organization--it's a political party; I'm not denying its importance (though that too may be called into question, I suppose), but it seems to me to be questionable as to why we'd want to feature in a place of relative prominence--especially in place of other more widely known alumni--given that this particular political party has never exerted a significant sway on American politics. Tmnh07 (talk) 21:12, 27 October 2017 (UTC)
No, you really don't have to "graduate" to be an alumnus of an institution. I'd personally prefer if that were the widely accepted and used definition but colleges and universities - presumably in an attempt to cast a broader net for fundraising and prestige-claiming purposes - very widely use the term to refer to anyone who matriculated. However, it is nice to have a word for that class of people; we don't really need another word for "graduate."
Back on the real topic: I'm perfectly fine if this alumnus is omitted from this article on sensible, NPOV grounds. This is an old university (by U.S. standards!) so we need to have some criteria for inclusion in this article. I'm not sure that "graduate" is really the best criterion - I'm betting that there are many very prominent non-graduates - but if you come to a consensus on this as a criterion then please (a) rename the section so it's explicit for readers and (b) double-check that the criteria have been consistently applied. ElKevbo (talk) 22:32, 27 October 2017 (UTC)
I'd say if we wouldn't put Ted Turner in, we can safely leave Rockwell out. --SarekOfVulcan (talk) 12:55, 30 October 2017 (UTC)
*headdesk* I'm just digging myself deeper here, aren't I? *wanders aimlessly away* --SarekOfVulcan (talk) 12:57, 30 October 2017 (UTC)

Brown's religious freedom reflects that of Rhode Island[edit]

At its foundation, Brown was the first college in the United States to accept students regardless of their religious affiliation,[1] reflecting the religious liberty that Roger Williams established in what would become the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

The italicized text is what I put in, that got taken right out for lacking a source.

I've got better things to do with my time than look for references saying there was religious freedom in colonial Rhode Island. Anyway, that’s how I think the article could be improved. deisenbe (talk) 19:54, 9 February 2018 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ Bronson (1914), p. 30.