Talk:Unibroue

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Nationalist?[edit]

It has been argued that Unibroue, until they were bought by the Ontario-based Sleeman's, made beers for a sovereigntist and nationalist audience

It seems to be currently being argued that Sleeman's purchase has changed that, but I haven't noticed any difference in the beer, labeling, or branding since the purchase. Surely if they were doing so before they were bought, then by not changing those aspects they are still doing so?

They seem to be marketing the beers in English Canada under semi-anglified names; "la Maudite" has become simply "Maudite", and "la Fin du monde" is being called simply "Fin du monde" (though the label for that one still retains the article). These may have been changed by Unibroue before the buyout, though (?). As a seperate note, the various Éphémère flavours aren't all "active beers", since they make a different one each year and thus far haven't repeated them. - toh 19:11, 2005 August 25 (UTC)
I think that's just peculiarities of usage showing up. On the French Unibroue website right now, they list the contents of two variety packs: one has all of the beers listed with articles, the other doesn't -- and while their list of beers uses articles, each beer page (for instance, here doesn't. (And the label for Trois Pistoles doesn't have the article on that page either, although the label for Fin du Monde does. I can't remember what the FdM label looks like here in Ontario though.)
The 12-bottle variety pack on the main page there offers three kinds of Ephemere, though, so I'm not sure about the annualness of it -- the only other way I've seen it offered is in an 8-pack, two of each flavor and two of the base beer without fruit (which is some seriously disappointing beer). The English website only shows the apple Ephemere in the list of beers, but the French website shows them all in the Ephemere entry. — mendel 00:18, August 26, 2005 (UTC)
In the US, they are in their 'nationalist' form with articles and history intact. Lowmagnet 22:13, 4 February 2006 (UTC)

Not to start too much of an argument about all this but if a company had produced in ontario beers with names such as "Mackenzie", "Thrillium", "Niagara Falls" or the like, no one would have called that "nationalistic". It would simply be representative of a micro-brewery naming its beers after local elements. In any case, I think the marketing was originaly more a question of youth vs older drinker then anything (in the first few years, you had more chances of finding their beers in a pub near a college or uni then in an old style tavern). --Marc pasquin 17:10, 1 April 2006 (UTC)

Sorry - a bit of a newbie, but changed Barberie location - it's in Quebec City not Montreal - and now sentence reads funny. The organisation in question is Le Québécois, which seems to be a political lobbying group? Should be clarified if anyone knows what it is, as the way it's worded now 'group' could mean conglometrate. Anyway, wonder if it should even get a mention here as it's getting a bit off topic, especially as Sapporo has, or is about to, buy out Sleemans. John W 00:23, 12 September 2006 (UTC)

Just like Marc is saying up there, I fail to understand why a brewery naming its beers after elements taken from the culture and traditions of its area of origin should be considered a bad thing...

Some New Ideas[edit]

I am thinking of taking some pictures of Unibroue in the process of being enjoyed to help liven up the page a bit. Also, I think it might be appropriate to at least mention the proper pronunciation of the name (in French and English dialects perhaps). Just some thoughts from a newcomer, but an ardent lover of this purveyor of delicious ales. Any thoughts? I'd like to hear from anyone with suggestions.--Uncultured 05:56, 7 February 2006 (UTC)

What about beer labels ? --Marc pasquin 17:10, 1 April 2006 (UTC)


I don't know how to use wikipedia but wanted to comment that the phrase "Unibroue has been joined by the likes of Cheval Blanc and McAuslan." at the end of the article is pretty strange considering both those other breweries were open before Unibroue. It must mean the three are enjoying the "growth of microbrewing" but that really isn't clear. -K.S. 12/7/06